Also see this list of agricultural terms and their definitions: news.cahnrs.wsu.edu/agricultural-style-guide-for-journalists/

 

4-H’ers. Always hyphenated. Not 4-Hers nor 4-H’rs.

 

and/or. Avoid. In most cases, either and or or is correct. When a choice cannot be made, use “X, Y, or both.”

 

Columbia Basin. Capitalized; it’s a recognized geographical region within the state.

 

data. Use in a plural rather than singular sense because Extension publications should convey scientific expertise. (Singular is conventional for a non-technical audience.) Use the phrase “data set” or “data point” for a singular construction, if it makes sense in context.

 

eastern Washington. Not capitalized; like other compass-point references to regions of the state.

 

e.g. exempli gratia, for example. Often confused with i.e. (“that is”). Best avoided—either use “for example” or a similar phrase, or use “etc.” at the end of a list. (Note: do not use both e.g. and etc. together—that is redundant.) May be used in very technical publications, but verify that the correct abbreviation is used. When used, follow the abbreviation with a comma, and enclose he whole phrase in parentheses (e.g., something like this).

 

farmers market. In the sense of a market full of farmers, but not belonging to them. See grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/grammar-apostrophes.aspx.

 

flier. For a handbill or paper handed out. Preferred over “flyer,” per AP. CMoS doesn’t seem to have an opinion on this one. Merriam-Webster lists “flyer” as a variant of “flier” so let’s use the non-variant. (But “flyer” is more common in British English.)

 

foodborne. One word.

 

forest owner. Open even as an adjective phrase. (It’s become a standard phrase in our materials.)

 

herb, herbaceous, herbicidal, herbicides. Preceded by “an” not “a” (because the aitch is silent).

 

i.e. id est, that is. Often confused with e.g. (“for example”). Best avoided—use “that is,” “in other words,” or a similar phrase. May be used in very technical publications, but verify that the correct abbreviation is used. When used, follow the abbreviation with a comma, and enclose the whole phrase in parentheses (i.e., style it like this).

 

landowner. One word. (Contrast with “forest owner” which is open.)

 

management of vs. management for. In discussions of pest management, it is management of a problem (the problem being the pest); therefore, the phrase should be “Management of [flea beetles]…. (“Management for” could be misinterpreted as managerial skills for pests.)

non-. Check dictionary (www.merriam-webster.com) for construction (open, hyphenated, or closed).

 

north central Washington. Not capitalized; no hyphen.

 

Washington State or the state of Washington. (Per CMoS 16, but contrary to WSU University Printing which would style it “Washington state” to avoid any possible confusion between a reference to the state or the university.) Capitalize “state” when it is part of the proper noun, and lowercase “state” in the second construction shown. (Similarly: Whitman County, Columbia River, etc.)

 

western Washington. Not capitalized; like other compass-point references to regions of the state.

 

year-round. Hyphenated in all forms.