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Posted by kaury.balcom | November 17, 2016
Dr. Jim Harbertson, WSU associate professor of enology is named 50 Top Leaders by Wine Business Monthly
Dr. Jim Harbertson WSU associate professor of enology is named 50 Top Leaders by Wine Business Monthly

Harbertson honored by Wine Business Monthly Magazine

WSU associate professor of enology Dr. Jim Harbertson has been honored as one of Wine Business Monthly’s 50 Top leaders!

The magazine selected Dr. Harbertson, one of three wine scientists named, for “moving the ball on phenolic measurement with the Harbertson-Adams Assay.”

Featured in the December 2016 issue, Wine Business Monthly selected 50 leaders that had considerable impact in 2016 and are shaping the wine industry today.

 

Ravenholt lecture on collecting, interpreting vineyard data

A free talk about using sensors and digital mapping to track vineyard health was presented to about 40 researchers, grape growers and students on Nov. 9.

Held at the Ste. Michelle Wine Estates Washington State University Wine Science Center, the presentation featured the research and expertise of Dr. Terry Bates, director of the Cornell Lake Erie Research and Extension Lab.  Dr. Bates, a national leader in wine and juice grape research and extension, discussed his on-going research project supported by a $6 million federal grant that is part of the USDA’s Specialty Crop Initiative.

Dr. Terry Bates, director of the Cornell Lake Erie Research and Extension Lab presents his research during the Ravenholt Lecture Series.
Dr. Terry Bates director of the Cornell Lake Erie Research and Extension Lab presents his research during the Ravenholt Lecture Series.

Bates and his multi-disciplinary team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon, Penn State, Newcastle University and the University of California Davis developed and implemented digital mapping technology to gather information on vineyard conditions.

Across the vineyard, mobile sensors take measurements and gather data on soil, crop and canopy conditions.  The data collected by these sensors create maps using software developed by the research team. Growers can then use the maps to identify weaknesses in the vineyard and apply resources to specific areas.

Once in the hands of growers, precision mapping technology like this could prevent crop loss and increase quality, meaning big gains for the wine and juice grape industry.

This free educational event was made possible through an endowment from the Albert R. Ravenholt Foundation.  The Ravenholt Lecture Series brings grape industry professionals to WSU to share their research and professional perspectives.