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$3.29 million effort keeps onions, garlic safe from pest and disease threats

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Adding flavor to our plates and antioxidants to our diets, onion and garlic are among the most valuable vegetable crops in the world, with an…

Orchard tours share WA 38 knowledge with growers

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Nearly 200 apple growers and industry professionals gathered recently at Washington State University’s Roza and Sunrise research orchards in Prosser and Wenatchee, Wash., to encounter…

Researchers to help water flow more freely to farms, fish and people with USDA grant

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New technology and management approaches could help the West’s precious water flow more efficiently for farmers, residents and fish, thanks to pioneering work by scientists…

Cougar donations feed momentum to build a world-renowned pollinator center

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WSU alums Ken and Sue Christianson donated $1 million dollars to WSU to support a Honey Bee and Pollinator Research Facility on WSU’s Pullman campus.

College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Science

With 22 majors, 19 minors, and 27 graduate programs, the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences is one of the largest and most innovative colleges at WSU.

Leaders in Discovery

In 2016, CAHNRS secured research funding exceeding $83 million, which accounts for more than 40% of all WSU research funding.

 

Support for Students

CAHNRS awards roughly $700,000 in scholarships annually. And to enhance experiences and opportunities, students can participate in 40 different clubs and organizations.

 

Real-World Impacts

CAHNRS Cougs extend science to serve individuals, families, and communities at home and around the world. Our impacts enhance quality of life, improve ecological and economic systems, and advance agricultural science.

 

Learn more about CAHNRS
 
 

Support CAHNRS

Your support for the CAHNRS and WSU Extension Excellence Funds allows us to enhance the educational experience and bolster our college’s programs, faculty, and facilities

CAHNRS News

Researchers to help water flow more freely to farms, fish and people with USDA grant

Published on
New technology and management approaches could help the West’s precious water flow more efficiently for farmers, residents and fish, thanks to pioneering work by scientists…
$3.29 million effort keeps onions, garlic safe from pest and disease threats

$3.29 million effort keeps onions, garlic safe from pest and disease threats

Published on
Adding flavor to our plates and antioxidants to our diets, onion and garlic are among the most valuable vegetable crops in the world, with an…
Fall 2018 WSDA Waste Pesticide Collection Events

Fall 2018 WSDA Waste Pesticide Collection Events

Published on
Cougar donations feed momentum to build a world-renowned pollinator center

Cougar donations feed momentum to build a world-renowned pollinator center

Published on
WSU alums Ken and Sue Christianson donated $1 million dollars to WSU to support a Honey Bee and Pollinator Research Facility on WSU’s Pullman campus.
WSU research helps breed better-tasting sweet corn in $7.3 million grant

WSU research helps breed better-tasting sweet corn in $7.3 million grant

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Lindsey du Toit, vegetable seed pathologist at Washington State University’s Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center at Mount Vernon, is a co-primary investigator on a…
$5.6 million for specialty crop research protecting grapes, onions from pests and diseases

$5.6 million for specialty crop research protecting grapes, onions from pests and diseases

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Two national research teams led by scientists at Washington State University will protect valuable U.S. grape, onion and garlic crops from devastating and fast-adapting pests…
Tailgate event shares spirit of CAHNRS

Tailgate event shares spirit of CAHNRS

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  New Dean André-Denis Wright joined alumni, faculty and students in the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resources Sciences to share the spirit, strength…

Featured Video

The WSU Bees are getting ready to get back to work for the spring. Here’s how they survive the cold winters.